Intel's embedded sensors shirt is the most literal embodiment of 'wearable'

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich shows off their sensor shirt
By Derek Kessler on 28 May 2014 03:53 pm
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There are wearable devices, and then there are wearable devices. Intel's most recently revealed project is definitely part of the latter category: it's a shirt laden with embedded sensors. A smart shirt isn't a new concept — in fact, it's one that Intel had talked about as recently as CES 2014. But at today at the Code/Conference, CEO Brian Krzanich revealed a prototype of Intel's shirt. Unsurprisingly, it's blue.

The shirts sensors are meant to track your heart rate, though presumably with as large of a canvas as a shirt, Intel could embed other sensors into the garment, and thus create other garments (connected briefs, anyone?). This is really only a reference design for Intel; they'd prefer to partner with clothing manufacturers to embed this technology into a wider range of shirts.

Computing is actually done by the shirt, or at least by an attached Intel Edison computer, a small development board that's about the size of two fingers. That computer, along with the battery, have been made to be removable for washing, and are stored in a small pocket on the shirt when in use. The shirt can communicate with your phone over Bluetooth, or the Edison board can use its own built-in Wi-Fi to connect directly to the internet and upload data to cloud services.

Intel has their own ideas about what you could use this kind of sensors+computer+connectivity for, but we're really more interested in what you would like to see out of sensor-laden clothing. Let us know in the comments!

Source: Re/code

12 comments

datengu

There you go. Smart move for smart wear. Although, body odor much? ewww.
How about wireless charging on that shirt! :D Put something in the breast pocket of the shirt and it charges. haha.
But if it can track all of your vitals and more, the applications for "smart gowns" on hospitals would be pretty amazing.

Koko Pineda

I like that smart gowns so nurses and doctors get to track the condition of their patients anytime, anywhere.

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bradpromac

My concern would be how wash and dry this shirt.

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Drew Oswalt

I want a Back to the Future shirt or jacket. Automatically dries and fits to your frame.

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pkcable

Finally a real wearable smart shirt!!!!

rizzo183

haha! "Yes ...a couple of AMD undies, with bluetooth, and a pair of Intel socks please"

Koko Pineda

I would want to wear a connected brief that can track my sexual activities. Anyone interested? Hahaha!

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mtshelbygt

I was beginning to think nobody would come up with a smart shirt but now my prayers have be answered, in all seriousness tho as a previous comment stated this would be useful in hospitals!

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tmaze

It could also be a medical monitor for out patients - sending data to the medical facility.

ptboucher

I could see this having many applications for the military (imagine a computer program that shows realtime the location of all soldiers on a "battlefield" or a given area, and their relevant health information, like stress levels, hydration, muscle fatigue, etc.), law enforcement (similar to military, but more about tracking/monitoring, recording, automating various actions through monitoring of the officers movements), medical (a smart hospital gown), professional sports (measurement of technique via movement tracking, monitoring player fatigue, gathering an incredible amount of data to be combined with actual game stats to understand strengths and weaknesses in a situational context). The possibilities are only limited to the types of sensors we can develop and integrate within the clothing, but I definitely think this is a much more valuable approach to "wearables" than a bulky device that fits awkwardly on your wrist...

Seth Chastain

I work in the outdoor clothing industry and I could see that there would be some use for this. Can't wait to see where it goes.

marcch

I recommend you check out Hexoskin (www.hexoskin.com). They're a Montreal based startup that has been working on a "smart shirt" for a while. The product is actually available to buy.