Nest CEO reassures us that their thermostats won't show ads

Nest
By Simon Sage on 22 May 2014 09:36 am
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Following the big hubbub about Nest connected thermostats potentially showing in-home ads after an SEC filing from Google, Nest CEO Tony Fadell has stepped forward to assuage any worries. Here's what he said in a recent chat with Re/code.

"Nest is being run independently from the rest of Google, with a separate management team, brand and culture. … For example, Nest has a paid-for business model, while Google has generally had an ads-supported business model. We have nothing against ads — after all Nest does lots of advertising. We just don't think ads are right for the Nest user experience."

This falls in line with Phil's follow-up on the issue. We may very well see ad-supported appliances in the future, but that's a broad and general assumption that can't readily be applied to the near future with Nest.

That said, down the line would you pick up a connected thermostat that was $50 cheaper than Nest but subsidized by ads? Is there any amount of savings that would make it worth having a blender suggest a nearby smoothie place to you?

Source: Re/code

Related: Nest News

12 comments

Sonicaholic

That's probably a good job considering it's price and function, I'm not sure I would tolerate adds on my 500 buck thermostat.
I don't use free apps on my smartphone so it's not like I see adds on my phone or tablet I removed the offending folder from my Gmail account now don't see them there, I usually only watch programs from recordings so no adds there ..Personally life would be much better if I didn't see any at all. If I want something I'll research it then go shopping.

SpookDroid

I wouldn't mind seeing some ads as long as they're unobtrusive and not annoying with audio/video or something like that, especially if it means that the product will cost much less upfront because they'll be able to make up for it on ad revenue.

Shreyas13

This is what I said on the article that was on here previously about this. It depends on how it's implemented, I have not seen anyone complain about how Amazon implemented it on kindle. I'm sure they are doing just fine. The nest is something that you paid for at full price up front and will not suddenly start showing ads. Google isn't stupid and knows that backlash and hit they would take if they suddenly started pushing ads on something that was paid for up front and not cost subsidized by having ads. I'm not surprised that they had to put out this statement based on the crazy reaction, but I think this was obvious.

Gator352

Keep thinking that.

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chefmorry

I don't think that feasibly the Nest will ever show ads, and I trust the CEO of Nest when he says that the product will not be ad driven.

What I do believe is that Nest will somehow gather information on your living habits based on when you're in and out of the house and Google will use that information on their other products that are ad driven.

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Wicket

it's silly the things people assume when Google buys a company.. I mean I get it because yeah they like to show us ads and they make money doing that. As others have said I wouldn't hate it if it made it cheaper, or offer the option to pay more (what it currently costs) to remove the ads, kinda like what they first Kindle Fire did.

Quasar

I knew there was nothing to worry about!

Revolver

I don't have a problem with the theory of subsidizing device prices with ads, as long as the consumer has a choice for a no ad model. However, this practice can quickly change from "give a discount to the ad supported models" to "charge regular price for the ad model, and a premium price for the ad free model". That said, the company can charge whatever they want for their products, nobody is forced to buy one. I'd be interested to see what the ratio of Kindle's sold "with ads" vs "without ads" is.

As far as Nest goes, everything the CEO said can change very quickly if Google decides to. He's stating how it is now, not how it'll be next week/month/year.

Drew Oswalt

If they displayed ads, the company should provide the product for free.

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